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Article by Sue Comont, based on lecture notes from Rushden Boot and Shoe School 1935 - 1936 and 1948 - 1950
Shoemaking - Hand Lasting

Selection of pincers used for hand lasting
Selection of pincers used for hand lasting

Picture of a handlaster at work
Picture of a hand laster at work
The hoisted method is used in hand lasting. The procedure is to place the upper over the edge of the last with the back slightly below the back of the last. The backstrip is centered in position and a moderate strain is taken at the toe end. This first strain is called the longitudinal strain and it will cause the upper to grip the last in the hollows on its side. The upper is gripped on the side and is stretched taut across the curve beneath the vamp, stopping the upper from falling when the last is removed.

The next strain taken is the transverse strain which is taken in the hollow and across the forepart of the last in two parts:

The first is taken on the inside where the cap meets the vamp

The second is taken at a point opposite this on the outside

This transverse strain is to balance the upper on each side of the longitudinal strain and give it the shape of the last.

The 4th strain is to hoist up the back which stretches the upper again in length and gives fit in the instep.

Strains 5 and 6 are taken on the stiffener, first on the inside and then at a point opposite that.

Strains 7 and 8 are taken on the inside joint first and then at a point opposite on the outside joint.

Picture of an upper lasted ready for hand sewing
Picture of an upper lasted ready for hand sewing



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